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VinylRecorder T560 Cut your own vinyl records

VinylRecorder T560
Cut your own vinyl records

Fritz and Ulrich Sourisseau are self-proclaimed vinyl-cutting aficionados, based in southern Germany. Their latest venture is the development of a contraption that fits on to a Technics 1200 or 1210 MkII (as ‘industry standard’ as things get in DJing circles), and enables the user to cut their own vinyl discs.

The VinylRecorder T560, as it’s called, looks a little like something from the Frankenstein’s drawing board, but is in fact a custom-made, hand-built and incredibly complex device. The vinyl-cutting process requires a heated stylus, an RIAA frequency-curve encoder, a miniature vacuum-cleaner, various motors as well and numerous other precision components. All these — as well as a lamp and a 40x microscope to check that the process is going to plan — are included in the T560’s. All you need is the turntable to get cutting.

Fritz and Ulrich are keen to stress that their device cuts music on to actual vinyl discs, not acetate ‘dubplates’, the latter of which tend to deteriorate in quality with frequent playing, and especially when scratching and cueing. The T560 can record at speeds of 33rpm, 45rpm and 78rpm, and at 33rpm can squeeze 30 minutes of music on a 12-inch disc. What’s more, using the standard equipment fitted to the Technics turntable, users can monitor directly from the disc while it’s being cut.

For further details, head to Fritz & Ulrich’s web site, where prices for vinyl blanks and optional extras are also available.

www.vinylrecorder.com